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Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Who? (From 2013)

Hello All,  This is a blog that I started back in 2013 and somehow never finished, I thought I would post it as is and the conversation alone is kind of how my life goes as a whole.  Enjoy!


I recently had the pleasure nay privilege to have witness one of 80s music greats.  If you have ever seen any Brat Pack film from the 1980s and ever owned any of the soundtracks, this band is right up there with Psychedelic Furs, Simple Minds and The English Beat.


                                                                             


I'm speaking about they who are Orchestral Maneuvers in the Dark.  You probably know them better as OMD.  If you know them at all.  I would love to think that everyone knew who they were, but that would be wishful thinking and that's a completely different band. (I crack me up)


                                                                               



This is an actual conversation that I had with a young lady while I was waiting for the box office to open.

Nice Young Lady:  Excuse me Ma'am, what time does the box office open?

Me:  10 minutes ago (laughs a bit)

Nice Young Lady:  Oh lol, I guess they are late.  (Pause)  So who are you going to see tonight?

Me:  OMD.

Nice Young Lady:  Who?

Me: Um..OMD,  from the 80s, they had some big hits.  Perhaps you've seen the movie Pretty In Pink?

Nice Young Lady:  Oh yeah, my mom is always trying to get me to watch that stuff.

Me:  Ahh..well maybe someday (both laugh a bit)  So who are you here to see?

Nice Young Lady:  Oh------(about 5 different bands that I'd never heard of at another venue for some dance festival of some kind)  

Me: Hah! My turn...Who?  (both laugh again)


                                                                       


Some how I knew I wasn't going to get through to her no matter what, but you know that's okay.  She wasn't the only one that didn't know who they were.  Quite a few of my contemporaries were unfamiliar with the name as well.  Oh they knew the songs but didn't realize that's who sung them.  Most of them anyway, I will give credit where credit is due..and none where it's not, lol

Fast forward to 2016 and I am still explaining to people who different bands are from the 80s.  My children have since latched on to the fact that I am a permanent fixture in that amazing decade and now every time there is a song on the radio that someone has either covered, sampled or remixed, I get the standard question "Mom, was this a song from the 80's" and I usually respond, "yes", "no", not even close"  


                                                                                   




I really don't mind it actually, the whole, explaining who someone is to someone who's never heard them before, it makes me feel as though I am a historian, passing on vital music information to the generations.  Either that or I have an abundance of useless information swimming around in my head waiting for the next recycle bin dump.  

I hope it comes soon,  At my age, I can use all the free brain space I can get.

Ciao for Now ;)

Friday, May 20, 2016

20 Questions with 80sMusicGirl-An Interview with Critically Acclaimed Author of Sawdust Caesars: Original Mod Voices-Tony Beesley

Hello and Welcome to 20 Questions with 80sMusicGirl, the interview today is with Author/Musician and life-long music fan Tony Beesley!

                                                                              







1. Hello Tony, how about you start us off by introducing yourself.



I am a self-published author and owner of ‘Days like Tomorrow Books’. I have a huge passion for, perhaps obsession of, music and all the relative pop culture that surrounds it, in particular the early punk period of the 70’s and the sixties and beyond Mod culture … but also, much more besides. Following the loss of my day job earlier last year, I decided to go full-time with my writing and publishing venture, which had started back in 2008 publishing six books in total so far. I also write free-lance for magazines, namely reviews for Vive Le Rock magazine, but I have also written for other features for publications such as ‘All Mod Icon’ and ‘My Kind of Town’ etc. I also occasionally contribute to other writer’s books such as ‘Thick as Thieves: personal Situations with The Jam’ etc.

                                                        




2. Where are you from originally?



I was born in a former pit village, Rawmarsh in the mid-60’s, which is situated a few miles out of Rotherham and relatively close to Sheffield. I still live there.




3. Do you come from a big family?



I have two older brothers, considerably older, my eldest brother, Paul, was 18 when I was born and Glen was 11. So, there’s quite a big age gap between us. My dad was a lifelong working miner and as a result of his work underground this led to his premature death aged 53 in Feb 1978. My Mum worked in the munitions factory during WW2 and then spent her life bringing us kids up and holding down various part-time jobs to help make ends meet. My parents were both very strong-willed individuals of – shall we say – the old school types. They were honest, hard, kind and firm but fair people and also great parents. I wouldn’t say it was a big family in size, but it soon expanded when my eldest brother had kids, who were not that much younger than myself. As a family we had our ups and downs but I mostly look back on those days of growing up in the late-60’s and 1970’s as happy and great days. So much so, that I wrote a self-biographical book in 2008 of those days, laced with humour, mischief and nostalgia, based around my experiences and how the world around me was changing. The book is called ‘Kid on a Red Chopper Bike: growing up in the 1970’s’ and has received lots of positive feedback from readers who could relate to the memories.


                                                    








4. What were some of your hobbies growing up?



Wow, what a question, a great one too. Born in 1965, I was a part of a childhood generation that was obsessed with the Second World War and the many historical battles of old combined with living in a time of the great toy revolution. As a consequence, the toys, games and colourful attractions for a wide-eyed kid growing up at the time were huge. I started on plastic toy soldiers, small Airfix ones then slightly larger Britains Swoppets, Timpos, Crescent and Lone Star Wild West figures. All of these were accompanied, when funds allowed, with same scale Wild West forts and buildings, Stagecoaches and war vehicles, cannons etc. Countless fireside and back garden battles took place with these small and formidable regiments and the fun we had was truly captivating, a time when us kids really did use our imagination. Of course, TV played a huge influence with the many war films, Westerns, TV shows, Gerry Anderson puppet shows and much more.  I then moved onto Airfix models. Lego was also popular as was Scalextric race sets. Also plastic guns for scraps with my mates on the nearby derelict garages, fields and quarries. I also collected gum cards which we would swap in the playground and I was a bit of a budding artist too, spending hours copying artwork from the many comics we read. I could go on forever with stories of the hobbies and mischief of those days, hence my writing a book about it all. I know it all sounds dreary-eyed and looking at the past through rose-tinted glasses, and it’s true we had some hard times too, but those days were magical and I wouldn’t swap them for anything.


                                                      





5. What were your aspirations as a young man?



This would be when music entered my life really. Whilst starting my pop music journey throughout the early to mid-70’s, with sneak plays and the adoption of my next brother up, Glen’s Glam records such as Bowie, T-Rex, Sweet, Mott the Hoople etc. and listening to my mate down the street, Andy’s collection of Sparks, Suzi Quatro and so on. it would not truly be until punk arrived that I really began to have serious aspirations relating to music in my life. Just prior to punk, I had been indulging in regenerated rock ‘n roll records too. Whereas growing up I always fancied the typical lad’s dreams of being a soldier, a Grand Prix racer and all that, now I wanted to be member of a band.

When I say be a member of a band, I still wasn’t sure how or what I wanted to play or anything. I had no musical background and the only instrument I had ever possessed was a cheap acoustic guitar I had been bought for Xmas around 1973, which I would bang the strings to and mime to Slade records. Now, I was sure of the fact that I wanted to express how I felt via angry and frustrated poetry/ song lyrics – this combined with a deep desire to be creative in some form or another. The impulsive energy and non-conformity of punk fit me like a glove. In my suburban ‘out-of-town’ surroundings, myself and a couple of good mates managed to embrace the new sounds and ideals and create our own vision and version of what punk was to us, something quite removed from how the more informed and hip punks in the big cities would cultivate, but nevertheless it was real!


Through this new set of aspirations and ways at viewing the world around us, I set upon creating a new wave fanzine called (quite aptly) ‘Clash’, which was followed by other attempts, none seeing more than 4 or 5 self-wrote and drawn issues each. I continued vexing my teenage angst within words and poetry and also started to draw again. On the clothes front they became gradually tighter and harsher and my old Airfix model paints were utilised to paint slogans across jackets. I also created home-made badges. This period was one of constant change, discovery, and experimentation and on a personal level an array of mixed-up emotions (my dad’s passing resulted in me – unknowingly - carrying an inner un-expressed grieving around for years). Conclusively, I suppose, looking back to those times, my real inner aspiration as a young man was to be creative and self-expressive and make my personal mark on the world in some form or another. I did eventually form bands and continued to write fanzine … embracing music and all of its profound influences from there on. The journey had just begun, I suppose!


                                                         




6. You said your hometown was relatively close to Sheffield. Now I'm not going to ask you what bands came from Sheffield, because it would be more like, what bands DIDN'T come from Sheffield back then. Did it surprise you that such amazing artists came from such humble beginnings?



To be honest, I rarely gave it that much thought. I suppose you take for granted what’s already on your doorstep. There had already been some really good local bands on the scene before I was old enough to see them or even know of them to be honest: bands such as The Extras and The Prams for example. I enjoyed lots of local bands ranging from [reputedly] the area’s first punk band Hobbies of Today (who played their very first gig at our local Youth Club in May 1977) to The Diks, Stunt Kites, Cabaret Voltaire, Uncool Dance Band, I’m So Hollow, and a little later on Artery (one of my faves). Also early Pulp, The Injectors, Vision, Veiled Threat and others. Of course, The Human League were popular and I much preferred their earlier darker electronic avant-garde sound than the revived pop line-up as popular and enjoyable as that was.

 A lot of these bands would also be seen as support acts to more known ones such as The Fall etc. but I would also venture to small pubs and venues (at a considerably under drinking age ) to see some of them. It’s only later, when I started to look back a little, that I fully appreciated how lucky the area was to have such a diverse and original-sounding clutch of bands and talent around to enjoy, though I do struggle to recall exact and clear memories of many of the gigs I attended. I do think that the Sheffield and surrounding areas’ musicians had a different approach to the rest of the country. Punk was mostly more of an attitude and influence injected into the music as opposed to a copy of the three chord punk blueprint. It was much more industrial and stark in sound, I suppose in reflection of the local steelworks industry around us. I am compelled to mention the help and positive focus on the local bands scene that music journalist, Martin Lilleker gave, including a fantastic source of info within his book ‘Beats Working For a Living’, a book that influenced my first book ‘Our Generation’. Sadly, Martin passed away earlier this year and will be sorely missed.


                                                    




7. Very sorry to hear that your father passed at such a young age. Did your parents, in those early days, have any influence on what you should choose as a career as an adult?



My parents didn’t really have a huge influence on me at that particular time, to be absolutely honest. They were of a totally different age - the war generation – and they were already in their 40’s when I was born. Not to say that they weren’t a huge significant part of my growing up, as they were and it was more in later years, especially when bringing up my own children, that I realised how much of a profound influence they really had on me.

In hindsight, looking back to that important time of growing up and my immersion into music etc I have some very happy memories of my parents. My Dad laughing at me when I attempted to self-pierce my ear, my Mum’s patience with my constantly changing clothes attire and outspoken views. My Mum was much-loved by all of my mates, she never flinched or complained about the unconventional styles of my friends who were always welcomed in our house and our front room became a meeting place and social core for many of my friends. The records were constantly playing, kids dying their hair, laughing, singing, playing instruments and so on. They all speak very fondly of her to this day..

                                                        


                                                       
8. When you speak of your hobbies, the intricacies of your interests really amaze me, Do you feel that having such detailed hobby interests possibly set up your life path later as an author?



I think that the attention to detail in all things is something that subconsciously led me onto my writing, yes. Amongst over things too and it would be never be a straight journey to that end, either. I don’t think it’s a decisive thing really … more a matter of circumstance(s). One thing leads to another and you don’t realise at the time where it’s all taking you, that’s my experience of it all, anyway.


                                                        




9. You talk about how you and your friends began to create your "own vision and version of what punk was to us" Are there any audio recordings of these?



Again, it’s really hard to define what that vision actually was. The adult version of ourselves all too easily clouds and erodes that period of naivety and sense of discovery. I try to immerse myself in my writing to how I actually felt like at that time. It’s almost like method acting in a way, getting into that character I once was, quite taxing too and mentally draining. I did use this way of reflection in my writing for a number of my earlier books.

So, back to that vision of punk? I suppose it was a very innocent and poorly informed one. We had very few peers or role models as such and took out of punk what we saw fit to use. We had missed that early surge of punk, but were really keen to catch up. Primarily it was the vibrant energy and creativity etc - all those things I spoke of earlier … it was a collective understanding that much more was possible, the old ‘have a go yourself’ mentality. So, in our suburban surroundings we rebelled against conformity, our parents, teachers and the pop culture around us.

We did this via clothes (almost all of which were improvised from existing ones, rarely bought from a shop already formed), poetry, song lyrics, writing, humour and the strong yearning to play an instrument. All of these were stripped of sentimentality and expressed with youthful exuberance. Our hair was (mostly) self-cut to appear harsh and unruly, our attitudes reflected what we were, not what we were being taught. Of course, much of this was all bullshit, really, teenage angst and typical hang-ups, raging youthful hormones and a distinct adversity to fitting in: saying no to the adult world wherever possible. Every generation since the 50’s has done it in one form or another … this was just our way and our time!

With regards to the audio, well there’s nothing of my earliest attempts at music, thank God ha ha. My first song ‘The Tramps’ - a school years study on the exclusion of the homeless in society -was wrote in 1978, and, although we did record some very rough recordings on cassette, they were never kept and more than likely recorded over by a John Peel radio session. Some later songs such as ‘Rearrange’ in 1982, which was a call for a new vision beyond punk, I do have the lyrics for, but not the basic home demo that was made, though I have searched for years to find it among the 100’s of old cassettes as I did keep that one for a while. I wrote a song called ‘Just for a Chance’ which was a rally against Terrorism in the late 70’s and early 80’s and I do have a very rough guitar and vocals home demo of that too. The songs I wrote for Control, Reaction and later Mod band The Way, many are preserved on cassettes, including a handful of gig recordings, rehearsals, and a studio demo. Some of these can be found on YouTube


                                                         

                                                      





10. Do you still have any of the fanzine's still around to share?



I don’t have any editions of ‘Clash’ and I only have a torn front page of ‘Ghetto’ fanzine. These were merely a few crudely put together issues, a sort of blueprint and learning experience for later. I never even sold any issues, just created them and shared with some friends. There are a few copies of my 80’s fanzine ‘Populist Blues’ knocking around. The 4 issues sold around a few hundred. Sadly, I don’t even have a copy of the ‘Populist Blues: punk 10 years on’ special which I did in 1986.

                                






11 So much history has passed in your life and now you are an accomplished writer, tell us how that all began. Tell us about your first book?



My first book came about by pure chance. I had shelved half-hearted manuscripts numerous times and had left one of these in the magazine rack, where my son (who was around 17 at the time) pulled it out and started reading it. I had forgotten all about it, but was surprised by his enthusiasm and encouragement. Between him and my wife, Vanessa, they both convinced me to have a proper go at it and from that chance occurrence; I began working on my first book ‘Our Generation’.

I have to be perfectly honest and admit, I really had no idea about writing a book as such, let alone the formatting, design, structure and many other technical aspects, but I had nothing to lose, so I gave it my best shot. This first book was a huge learning curve of trial and error, adapting, absorbing information and so much more. I did countless interviews, contacted by phone, email or in person scores of people who may wish to be a part of the book which was to be an aural account of the punk and Mod revival generation of Sheffield and the surrounding areas, an untapped source of history, really. The research was intense. Thankfully, I had kept a huge archive of old NME’s and Sounds etc. from my youth which were invaluable for dates, info and such like. People also came forward with old fanzines, personal photos and their memories and it started to gel pretty quickly. I got back in touch with an old friend Dave Spencer who offered to design the book’s cover (subsequently he has done amazing jobs for each of my following books). Another positive aspect was that I was remembering old stored away and almost forgotten memories of my own, which I added in there, but most profoundly it was a time of rekindling old friendships and picking up where we had left off many years previously. I tried to gain interest from a few publishing houses, some showed mild interest, but nothing solid, so I decided to go for it myself … the old D.I.Y punk spirit of having a go was still very much intact.


‘Our Generation’, I now look back on with a critical eye and can see how primitive and basic it was, yet it also had a certain charm too and without that book and everything I learnt, I would never have been able to make a start. For me, it’s all about learning from mistakes made and improving as I go along and that book, and all those fantastic people associated with it, gave me a chance to actually become a self-published writer and set my own publishing company up, which is called ‘Days Like Tomorrow’ books named after an old song of The Way’s, the Mod band I was in during the 80’s.



                                                    












12. How many books have you written all together?



Six books so far, though a number of prospected books have been either shelved or put on the back burner. My most accomplished and successful book title has been ‘Sawdust Caesars: original Mod Voices’ a huge project of 450 pages, my first hardback book and one that has been amazingly received worldwide from magazine reviews, critics and readers and, as previously mentioned, Paul Weller himself. The book chronicles the whole history of Mod from its earliest beginnings in the 1950’s throughout the classic sixties era and onto the revival of the late 70’s and beyond taking in Acid Jazz, Britpop and the present day Mod scene: virtually every aspect of Mod culture and includes 100’s of rare photos. I managed to track down numerous original Mods and capture their stories in their own words, a formula that seems to work very well as so many can relate to those individual accounts, often reflecting their own experiences.

    
                                                   
                                               



13. Do you travel much as a writer?



In context … not as much as I would like to. I regularly visit places such as Lincoln, where I made a great number of new friends during my work on ‘Sawdust Caesars’. The town features prominently in the book as do a good few Mods from that area. Lincoln is one of my favourite places. There’s a great and very friendly Mod/Soul crowd there and a superb record shop ‘Back to Mono’ run by Jim Penistan and the support from these people, significantly Glen Field who runs the A Lib club with his brother Lance, has been amazing. Also Eric South, Kate Harrison, Wiggy and a whole bunch of others who have been supportive and helpful. Other places I visit for book-related ventures are York and Scarborough and, of course, Sheffield itself.







14. How much more do you think your writing has fulfilled your life?



It’s hard to say how much and where and when, but I would say as a whole, it’s certainly changed my life dramatically: not from a financial aspect as it’s very unstable in that area and certainly not an easy and quick way of earning a living. Plus there’s no security as such. Thankfully, I have received lots of positive reviews and feedback for my books and this is the most rewarding aspect. My initial motivation was to get real stories and experiences out there on book shelves in order to preserve the memories and present an alternative version to what we most commonly read about. I suppose, I have achieved a positive amount of that and it remains my driving force moving into the future as there’s much more to explore and write about.


                                                     




15. I'm reading the first page of Away from the Numbers and you're meeting with Paul Weller during the Style Council years, tell me how amazing that had to have been to meet your hero!



Well, I won’t lie, it was amazing. That actually wasn’t the first time to be honest. I first met Paul very briefly in The Jam as Paul and the band were signing things for us fans. When I say met, I said ‘Hello’ ha ha! The next time was backstage at a Style Council gig a few years before the one you mention. Both occasions were memorable and special memories for me, especially the 1985 one, in which I got to talk to Paul about our band The Way and pass over a demo tape to his sister, Nicky, who later gave it to Paul. I suppose it was a bit surreal really, after all those years of listening to The Jam and the many memories attached, but on each occasion Paul was friendly and accommodating, appearing quite shy really, in a way. When Paul sent me a postcard last year congratulating me on ‘Sawdust Caesars: original Mod Voices’, saying how much he had enjoyed it … well that was a huge high point for me as a writer.


                                                                       


16. What’s your next project?


My next project, which I am working on at present, is the follow-up to ‘Sawdust Caesars: original Mod Voices’. Like the first one, this new volume will be a huge project and probably equal to its 450 pages. This one – titled ‘Mojo Talkin’; under the Influence of Mod’ digs even deeper into Mod’s impact and
influence on individuals and mediums across the decades from the late 50’s to the present. This volume will ideally complement the first one, whilst bringing lots of new angles and subject matter into the equation. It’s a really exciting venture and, hopefully, will be received as positively as its preceding volume.

                                                        




17. Your son seems very interested in your work, would you encourage him to become a writer also?


Yes, he shows interest and does share some of my tastes in music. We spend time listening to The Clash, Weller, Post-Punk sounds etc. and I introduce him to any new sounds I may be picking up as he did me some years back with the early Arctic Monkeys (Alex Turner’s Dad taught both myself and my son, Dean at school). I think it’s healthy to exchange taste’s and opinions across generations. To our chosen soundtrack (when we have the time) we also talk about the world’s problems and social change etc. bouncing opinions around. Would I encourage him to be a writer? No, not really. It has to be something you cultivate and nurture yourself, obviously with the help and support of others, but the inclination has to be there already. I can’t say I have noticed that in either of my sons, so far, to be honest. They both are happy in what they do, which in turn keeps me happy.


                                                         


18. You said that the positive receptions and feedback remain a “driving force moving into the future”, what do you think the future holds for you as you continue writing about these real stories and events?


To be honest, I don’t plan too far ahead into the future. I allow ideas and then projects to evolve. I can’t write to demand, so I couldn’t really choose a definitive subject out of the blue and write about it. All of my books that have been seen to the end and published, have all been projects that seem to capture me by chance, somehow. But, in effect, I think there are lots more to write about no matter what, so hopefully plenty more books to come.
I also want to publish other books by independent authors, which is something I am working on as well.


                                                    






19. Refresh my memory, you spoke of having met The Clash, but sadly there were no pictures taken. Tell me that story.


Having already seen the Clash on their ‘London Calling’ tour, one of the greatest gigs and musical epiphanies of my life, I later managed to hear about a gig at the Sheffield Lyceum in Oct 1981 and me and a mate got tickets in time before it sold out. This was a period of transition for The Clash. Their previous album [triple] ‘Sandinista’ had been critically mauled for being unfocused, self-indulgent and moving away from what fans – in general – expected from them.. It certainly was far removed from their early work. I, personally enjoyed it a lot. So, with all of this in mind, we were keen to see and hear how they had progressed from the last time.

On the day of the gig, which was a Sunday, me and my mate went up in the afternoon, hoping to get on the guest list somehow (It was often a case of being there in the afternoon to help move the gear in with the road crew, which got you a pass, something I had done for bands such as The Undertones and 999, previously). We sneaked through the venue’s side entrance a few times, seeing support band Theatre of Hate do their sound-check, but each time were thrown out. As the afternoon went on, we spotted the famous Clash car with CLASH number plates and asked a Rasta guy (who may have been their DJ?) if he needed any help? He asked us to carry some boxes into the venue and then asked us our names to add to the guest list. Needless to say, we were over the moon.

When the evening arrived and the doors opened, we decided to sell on our tickets to those without any … making sure we adhered to our punk principles and not charge them anymore than the ticket’s face value. As we queued up, we were asked for our tickets and said we were on the guest list, only to be told by the door men, that our names were not on there. Panic set in! We persisted that they re-check and by chance he saw them in tiny writing right at the bottom of the list. We were in!

I got to speak briefly to Mick Jones of the band in the crowd and was surprised by how slight and thin he was as opposed to the photos in the NME and on stage etc. Following an amazing gig, mixed with Clash classics, anthems and recent songs, the venue began to empty. We got chatting to a London punk lad called Frank and he persuaded us to let him sleep over at my place (he didn’t yet realise that we were walking twelve miles home after the gig). Then, Joe Strummer, Paul Simenon and Nicky ‘Topper’ Headon appeared from backstage to talk to the small gathering of fans left in the venue. I got my Clash t-shirt signed by all three members and also the inside of my leather jacket on the red lining. Joe Strummer was friendly, but appeared to be stoned, which wasn’t unusual for the time. 

Paul and Topper were very chatty and asked us where we were from etc. we relayed questions  back and forth, though time has eroded exactly what we all said. Then we had photos taken with them both. Sadly, these didn’t turn out when we took the camera in for development, so we were really disappointed. It was a very memorable experience, though. I later gave the leather jacket away (autographs still inside and intact) and my Mum washed the t-shirt by mistake which erased the autographs. Despite this, nothing will erase the excitement of the gig and meeting The Clash face to face. Like, so much of that period, the memories are precious and I sometimes have to pinch myself to believe that they all actually really happened!



                                                 




20. Where can we find your books on the internet?


My books are all available on amazon, except those out of print, which often demand high prices from sellers. Also, I regularly list on ebay. They can also be ordered from most good book shops and online.

The ideal source of purchase would be direct from myself via the website www.tonybeesleymodworld.co.uk as all the ones sold on there are personally signed by myself and I always run very good value SPECIAL OFFERS on the books. The previous few books, still in print, are now also very low in numbers, but the latest one ‘Sawdust Caesars: original Mod Voices’ remains in stock indefinitely.






                                                           




Friday, April 22, 2016

"I Only Want to Hear you Laughing in the Purple Rain"







I got to work yesterday morning and I had no sooner settle in than I received a phone call from my daughter.."Mom, are you sitting down?" I heard her trembling voice say.  I immediately braced my self for something horrible, like you do when someone asks you that question.  "What's wrong" I wanted to say "who died" like my grandmother always asked.  She knew how to get to the point.  I don't always like to assume, but sometimes you just have to accept the facts.  "Mom, they found Prince dead at his Paisley Park compound" "what?!" I said quietly but firmly, as I was quickly recalling the last time I had a call like this from my daughter.  It was when Michael Jackson died..receiving that news caused something in my heart to break, literally.  I honestly could not move for at least a minute.  It doesn't sound like a long time, but it can be eternity.









 And now the sensation was returning to my body that I remembered from 7 years ago.  Except this time, I felt as though life itself had been drained from my very being.  "Lisa," I said, "did you check?" and before I could utter another word, she said abruptly "YES!, it came from TMZ Mom, they are reporting this" I dropped several F bombs and just kept repeating  the word shit over and over..not wanting it to be true, not ready to lose another musical icon, hero, inspiration" I could barely utter the next few words "what happened?"  All my daughter could do was talk through her tears, and we all know that is pretty much impossible to comprehend, sometimes even for Moms.  "its okay honey" I said, I will go online and get some info" "are you going to be okay" I muttered quietly.  "NO" she replied rapidly and hotly" as if I should know better. But then she regrouped and asked if I was going to be okay.  My kids know their Mom, they know my love of music, my musical loves and my love of the 80s and Prince was all of those rolled into one.  I actually was blessed to see him not to long ago in Seattle at the Key Arena, thanks to my eldest son, he bought the tickets for me for my birthday that year. I really enjoyed the concert tremendously Prince was truly amazing, and he had the audience wrapped around his finger so deftly and exquisitely it was like we were a band of gold that he proudly displayed to the world.  And we were loving every minute of it.



All day yesterday I listened to MPR  Minnesota Public Radio, The Current, play the entire catalog of Prince.  If you are familiar with YouTube, you are not going to get a whole lot of Prince songs to add to a playlist and if you have the entire catalog in your possession you are a lucky individual.  I didn't have any of that with me at work.  I have somethings, mostly 80s stuff, but I have his Musicology album too and I really liked that.   All day long, I was engrossed in remembering and coming to grips with the reality that Prince Rogers Nelson had suddenly and abruptly left this mortal coil, leaving his loved ones and fans to mourn and try to heal our broken and devastated hearts




So today is #Purple Friday.  Last night the entire world dressed up its finest edifices in purple to celebrate and remember The Purple One.  I am wearing my purple today and a tiny umbrella pin to symbolically catch, the Purple Rain that are my tears for him.  His music will always inspire, his romanticism will always make women swoon and men want to have what he had.  His life was lived to the fullest and for his fans as one of his last acts here on earth was to do a concert the night before he died, because he didn't want to disappoint them. 



I want you all where ever you are today, hug someone you love, tell them you love them and wish them all the happiness in the world, because you just never know from one minute to the next. I love you all, big hugs for everyone reading this blog and I wish you all the happiness and love in the world.





"Sometimes it Snows in April, sometimes I feel so bad, sometimes I wish, that life was never ending, but all good things they say, never last.  Love isn't love til it's passed."


Rest In Peace

Thursday, December 3, 2015

You Spin Me Right Round!

Holy Smurf!

This has been a week from H-E-Double Hockey sticks if ever I have seen one.

I take the train to and from work every day.  Normally, things go pretty smoothly.  However for some reason this week, The train ride coming home has been anything from smooth.

Between people's cars stalling on the tracks and delaying the train.  Or people's cars stalling on the tracks and getting hit by the train (no one was injured).  Or just the conductor getting a bit confused and forgetting which platform the passengers need to stand on.

I have decided to blog about it.  Not in the conventional way but relative to what I know best.

I call it:

How I Dealt with the Nonsense of Transportation Interruptions for the Last 4 Days this Week.


Upside Down by Diana Ross



Blitzkrieg Bop by The Ramones



You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)-Dead or Alive



Safety Dance by Men Without Hats



Train of Thought by a-ha



Relax-Frankie Goes to Hollywood



We're Not Gonna Take It-Twisted Sister



I Don't Like Mondays-The Boomtown Rats



Break Out-Swing Out Sister



Tuff Enuff-The Fabulous Thunderbirds

So that's my take on the last 4 days of my week.  What will happen tomorrow?  I have nary a clue.  Do I have an 80s tune for that?




C'est La Vie- Robbie Nevil


Of Course.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Great Song. But What The Hell Does It Mean???

Okay, I love obscurity as much as the next person, but hidden meanings in songs have never been my forte.  There are so many great songs from the 80s that it would seem it would be difficult to choose which are my favorites.  Well I honestly can tell you that some of them that are my favorites are purely accidental. Mainly because I don't get them.  Yes that's right, those wonderful songs that you hear that leave you thinking>>um..what?

Now I know we can't ALL be like Morrissey, putting our normal everyday lives to music.  It's truthfully not as easy as it looks.   In contrast, songwriters feel like they need to take us waaaaaaayyyyy down deep in the cockles of their psyche to figure out what the blazes they are talking about.  I don't know about you, but I'm not going there.

Walk Like An Egyptian by The Bangles- Huh?  What the hell does dropping drinks and cops eating doughnuts have to do with Egypt?  Is it a metaphor?  Sorry you lost me.  Still its a great song because it's fun and easy to dance to.  Oh and there's a crap load of celebs and regular people in it too..nice touch girls.

I Just Died In Your Arms-Cutting Crew- Okay, this doesn't sound romantic at all, it's quite disturbing actually. "must have been something you said" What? Die Bastard?! Was that it?  It's quite a haunting and dramatic song which musically has its synth pop merits.  Will definitely keep it in the iTunes queue.

Any Song by Duran Duran!-Go ahead and pick one, (I dare you)  and I will admit to not getting it. My husband, Lord bless him tells me that they are all about sex.  I would like to believe that so that my brain doesn't hurt after listening to Hungry Like the Wolf or even better The Reflex.  Ordinary World could possibly be added to that list if I wanted to push the issue. Truthfully Ordinary World makes far more sense just as long as you don't watch the video.  (I plan on re-making it BTW, just on that principle alone)

I Ran by A Flock of Seagulls-Hey I get it..she has auburn hair and tawny eyes, that imagery is enough to scare the hell out of anyone, so yeah Run Dude! I think that they missed the mark on that one and should have recorded it in the the 60's and made it a psychedelic tune that you can trip to acid with.  Unless people were still dropping acid in the 80s and it worked just as well..??? (Shoot me a DM if you know the answer to that one ;))

Well there you have it, that's it for now.   Let me know if you think of anymore.  I would love to go on a personal journey with you to the unknown.  Not for very long mind you, I've only got so many brain cells left.

Now that I am at the end of my rant, I will leave you with some videos of just a few more of the most confusing songs that I have probably ever heard from the 80s.  Ta!

Man In Motion-John Parr
Sledgehammer-Peter Gabriel
Dance Hall Days by Wang Chung

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

20 Questions with 80sMusicGirl-Amanda Egan


Hello Everyone and welcome again to another thrill ride of an adventure with my newest blog endeavor 20 Questions with 80sMusicGirl.  Ever fancy your self being an author? Well here is a wonderful woman who did just that and has been successful ever since, so without further ado, here she is the lovely Amanda Egan!


                                                                     


First of all thank you again Amanda for allowing me this opportunity to interview you for my blog! I'm looking forward to a great interview so with that, let's begin!

Thank you for having me - always happy to chat to an 80's music lover!


1.  Where are you from originally Amanda?

I'm a born and bred London girl. I've mostly lived my life in Putney (South West London) but I lived in Hollywood for six months - back in the day when I was still trying to make a go of it as an actress.  


2.  Do you have any brothers or sisters?

I have two sisters - 10 and 12 years older than me.  I was a 'mistake' - my mum now tells me a very happy one! 


3.   What kind of student were you in school?

I was the model student!  I had my work in on time - but my mathematics was always wrong!  I don't do numbers AT ALL - never have and I never will - although I do have a weird talent for being able to double any triple-digit number you can throw at me.  I do words - you know where you are with words.


4.  What were some of your hobbies?

I love to entertain.  Dinner parties, themed nights, quiz nights - you name it.  I throw myself into the planning and preparation with lists upon lists to make sure I get my night just right.  I also enjoy any kind of crafts - from card making to knitting.  I listen to all types of music from heavy metal (thanks to the teen) to opera - and I LOVE musicals and old TV sitcoms.
And I read ... a lot
.


5.  What is your first memory of what you wanted to be when you grew up?

I started writing from the minute I could put a sentence together and wrote the first four chapters of a novel when I was ten.  (I found it in the drawer a while back and it delivered a good few giggles).  However, when I was about eleven I decided that the stage was calling, either as an actress or dancer.  The writing won!





6.   Wow London! That is amazing! If I were to come and visit, where is the first place you would take me?

I live very close to Richmond Park so I would take you for a drive through to see the deer - I never tire of looking at them - and we would then have a cream tea at Pembroke Lodge at the Surrey end of the park where you get the best views. Then we'd head off to see Wimbledon tennis courts - just 5 minutes away.  From there we'd go to the Buddhapadipa Temple, also in Wimbledon and the first Thai Buddhist temple to be built in the UK.  It's stunning!  Set in 4 acres of prime residential land and I always feel calmer after a wander around the grounds.  Of course we'd have to go shopping too - take in a West End show and have drinks at The Ritz!

7.  You've written a lot of books.  Do you base the characters on your life and experiences?

My 'Mummy Misfit' books were based loosely on my experiences at the school gates when my son was at a private prep school.  No one is TOTALLY real - more an amalgam of characters.  Take me to court and I'll stick to that!  My romcoms are based on bits of people I know or see on TV - writing is a weird cocktail of real life and anything else that finds itself in the mix before the fizz is added.

8.  Do you know of anyone else in your family that writes as a hobby or professionally?

As far as I'm aware, no one else writes.  Although, who knows?  They could have highly successful careers as writers of erotica and they're keeping it quiet!

9.   How do you plan your writing day?

I kick the teen out of the door on his way to work at 8.30 am and then the plan (!) is to write until 4.30 when I go to visit my mum.  Twitter, Facebook, blogs, email can eat into my time but, on a good day, I write 3,000 words.  A bad day? ... 3!  I DO set myself deadlines though because, as an Indie who needs to pay the mortgage and the bills, I feel I have to.  And I get very cross with myself if I don't meet those deadlines.  I'm a hard task-master.

10.  Who was your favorite author growing up?

I loved, loved, loved Enid Blyton and Noel Streatfeild and totally devoured their books.  Chicklit for young girls, at its finest - friendship, humour, love, loss and cracking plots.





11.  So I'm reading Cinderella' Buttons and I'm at Ramsey's chapter.  Was this one of those character moments that you borrowed from TV?Emoji

I guess our TV's are filled with colourful gay men but my inspiration comes from the fab guys I went to drama school with.  When I hit 18 and started my theatre training, a whole new world opened up to me and I found that friendships with men who had absolutely no interest in me sexually were just the best - generally speaking they say it as it is, have the best sense of humour and give wonderful hugs.  Thus, the fag-hag was born!  

12.  You say you have blogs plural, what are they about and where can we read them?

I have one blog but it covers a variety of topics, not just about my experience as an Indie.  In the past I've covered school phobia, breast feeding, eggs (!), periods, getting old - the list is endless.  Sometimes I've been known to have a rant about something that's annoyed me but I mainly try to keep it upbeat and cheery.  You can find my blog here.

13.  Are there any more novels in the works at the moment?

I've just completed the first draft of my June release novel and when I finish my holiday at the end of this week, I'll start on re-writes and edits.  I'm very excited about it - it's always such a relief when you type 'THE END' but that's when the really hard work starts.

14.  How does your family feel about you being a writer?

I think they're very proud of me and possibly a little surprised.  I've managed to turn a dream into a job which pays the bills and keeps the roof over our heads.

15.  Tell me more about your yearning to be an actress?

I started off wanting to be a ballet dancer but I grew too tall - and to be perfectly honest I probably wasn't terribly good!  My mum and dad started sending me to dance and drama classes to help boost my confidence as I was quite a shy child.  Suddenly, being on stage seemed like the best thing in the world and I knew that it was what I wanted to do with my life.  Sadly, the reality is it's a hard world to break in to and the necessity to earn living expenses forced me into part-time jobs and then full-time. Although I did have a two year stint in the kids' TV series 'Grange Hill' and I was also offered a lead role in a play on the South Bank but the theatre closed down due to government cuts.  My acting days are behind me now but I feel that writing brings out my creative side and I view the characters who live in my head as actors on a stage who I move around and feed lines - although they often tell ME what they want to do!



16.  Do you think as a woman, you have an advantage or a disadvantage as a writer?

I think that it's an advantage when writing chick-lit because obviously I'm privy to the workings of the female brain and all its quirks.  

17.  Do you desire to branch off into other genres of books, say children's books or a cookbook perhaps?

I've never considered writing a children's book but if that perfect idea popped into my head, who knows?  Once my current work-in-progress is with my proof-readers, I plan to continue with my party planning/recipe book, 'Mummy Misfit Entertains'.  This book will show how you can throw stylish events for very little money if you're prepared to use your imagination and put in some hard graft.

18.  Where do you see yourself in 10 years time?

I hope that I'm still writing and earning a living through doing what I love.  Some holidays would be nice too but as long as I still have a roof over my head, I'll be happy.  Who knows, I might even be a Granny Misfit by then!

19. How do  you feel social media has helped and or hindered you as a writer?

Social media has been a Godsend.  In the past writing could be a lonely business but now, within one click, we can find ourselves chatting to a friend (old or new) about anything and everything.  I've built relationships with writers and we support one another through the good times and the bad - sometimes all you need is someone who understands what you're going through to listen or to deliver a swift kick up the bottom.  The other plus is it sells books - and I don't mean by constantly plugging your work until people are bored.

 A comment on Twitter about a lost dog or Barry Manilow (!) has made me friends (who I've gone on to meet in real life) and gained me loyal readers.  The downside is, when you're working, you have to have the willpower to avoid constant chatting!  It's quite easy to lose a morning.

20.  If your son came up to you tomorrow and said. "Mum, I want to be a writer" what advice would you give him?

I'd say 'Go for it' but be prepared for a long hard slog.  The first part comes with writing 'Chapter One' and then it's bum on seat until you get to 'The End'.  It takes planning and determination and there will be days when you feel like giving in but, if you set yourself a deadline and stick to it, you'll get there.

Then the really hard work starts - rewrites and edits.  Good luck with that - it will drive you nuts but you will come out the other end.  Then we move onto the mammoth task of getting your work out there and your name heard.  As an Indie, that's a slow process but, once again, patience and commitment will get you there.  It's not a job for the lazy or half-hearted but it is rewarding.


(Thank you again Amanda for this amazing and insightful interview, if you all would like to read any of Ms Egan's books here are just a few places you can find them...)

Amazon UK
Amazon US
Blog
Twitter - @mummy_misfit
Facebook
Lulu - paperbacks